Exhibiting Your Art Work

January 16, 2016

I know…its been quite awhile since I've posted. I've been using the time to make my own work which really is a good thing. But I came across this article today – thanks to Cynthia Tineapple, for pointing it out! I think it is important enough to share since it's about the 5 crucial things to do AFTER an art opening. It's great info and really made me think about the exhibition process:

 

Typically we work like crazy to finish the work for an exhibit. Everything leads up to the exhibit and then once we get past that blip on the calendar we pat ourselves on the back for getting through the work of it. But there are some really good things you can do to stretch the momentum of an exhibit and resulting PR. Alyson Stanfield is known as a creative ArtBiz Coach. Check out her simple ideas here:

http://www.artbizblog.com/?mc_cid=d4c6101fcc&mc_eid=fc1f732b6d

To add to her ideas would be to:

1. Photograph the exhibit in place. Photos of an exhibit are useful for showing a professional display, future PR and adds credibility. Images for future postcards, etc. are always useful.

2. Always thank the gallery formally: send them a nice note. The personal touch from you recognizing their effort in your behalf helps to create a good relationship with the gallery. Fostering that relationship can only help you in the future.

3. Ask the gallery for PR materials to help promote your exhibit and periodically see if there are other times/other exhibits you can help to promote for them. This is good pay back and will ultimately pay YOU back in the long run because you have made a lasting impression with the gallery.

Good impressions, positive relationships, great connections accelerate an art career.

 

April Brings Exhibits!

March 29, 2015

I’ve been very busy!

Collage/assemblage with paper, paint, birch bark

Personal Maps #1: Breakthrough   Collage/assemblage with paper, paint, birch bark

 

 

 

April 6 – May 13 my collage/assemblage work will be featured at the Gallery at Towne Center in Lake Forest Park, WA.

Also April 16 – June 12 my jewelry work will be on display at the ArtsNow Gallery in the Edmonds Conference Center in Edmonds, WA.  The opening for this show will be April 16, 5-8 PM.

 

 

Collage/assemblage with paint, paper,

Gift to Life

Personal Maps #2: Symmetry

Personal Maps #2: Symmetry

 

 

FREE Class on Craftsy!

January 24, 2015

Enter to win my new class for free on Craftsy!

Enter before Tues., Jan. 23 by clicking on this link:

http://www.craftsy.com/ext/MeredithArnold_Giveaway

 

 

 

Making a Video!

November 11, 2014

I know I have been rather quiet of late… I am in the midst of my wonderful, new project: teaching online for Craftsy.com. I have been in the pre-production phase for many weeks now. What does that mean? It involves creating a 7 part video first. The video comes down to figuring out what is important to teach, how to say it and show it as well as creating the pieces that show the methods on the way to the end result in at least 3 steps plus the finished piece: so think 4 pieces for each 'chapter' or segment. Wow. That's busy!

We film the video next week! I'm so excited to do this! But here is what happens as an artist: cycles of pure confidence in what I know and can teach but then…a crises of confidence: consuming nervous anticipation that I'll be a total flub on camera. It's crazy. Where does this come from? I know what I know. I can only be me. They can edit, stop, start, reshoot, edit and did I mention EDIT? BREATHE! It'll be fun. REEEEALLLLY!

 

   So I haven’t posted here in quite awhile.  I was slammed at work and life for months.  Then I went to teach at Bead Fest Philadelphia in August and on the way back to Seattle I stopped in Colorado to attend an invitational retreat that I have been trying to get to for years.  Just before leaving I realized that I can’t work like this anymore.  There isn’t any break from the demand, no time to create, everybody always wants my help with something.  This isn’t the life I would choose for myself but here it is.  So before I left I told one college that I wouldn’t be teaching for them anymore.  I also decided that I will not be going out on the road so much anymore.  As much as I love my adventures it is clear that it’s very disruptive.  It takes a lot of time to organize everything, order materials for kits and classes, maintain inventory of the materials, count everything single thing for kits, pay for every single thing…I could go on and on.  Let’s just say that I’m currently a couple thousand dollars out and impatiently waiting to get paid (they take 40 days for goodness sake – ridiculous!).  So why would anyone want that job? I don’t.

  Unbelievably, I got a phone call today for work (on SUNDAY morning, I was barely awake).  It was business.  No emergency.  Just somebody wanting something and they have my cell phone number.  Really?  It couldn’t wait for a business day?  If I were teaching this weekend I would be juggling this call and a class at the same time? Ugh.

  Before I left I was awakened almost every day by a text message or a phone call.  I was scrambling around trying to get everything together to all hours of the night and people were waking me up 5 hours after I went to bed.

   It occurs to me to say: it’s my phone for MY needs.  Please don’t call me before 9 AM.

  So beyond the venting here there is a real life.  The real life I am choosing includes working in my studio, seeing my husband, cleaning my kitchen and even painting downspouts for the house.  Because I don’t work every minute.  No one ever said on their death bed: gosh, I wish I had worked more…

Happy Sun Storm Seattle!

 

Worthy Creative Advice

July 2, 2014

“Identify the primary distraction that keeps you from your creative work and deal with it. If you have an issue, be it weight, lack of exercise or family worries, do your best to resolve that issue or reduce it's power of distraction on your time and energy.” – Julieanne Kost (of Adobe Systems)

As I dive into a renewed commitment to my own creative efforts this quote is my scale. It is especially appropriate since I am slowly moving into using Lightroom and yes, that which I have avoided for years: Photoshop. I have always maintained that a good photographer shouldn't need to do much in software if an image is shot properly. I still believe this. Yes, a crop or exposure tweak after the fact may be needed but all the bells and whistles of Photoshop are not required. I realize that Photoshop has become a standard tool and by avoiding it I am just being contrary. Sometimes that's just how I roll.

But now I have owned Lightroom for about six months. I have barely had time to really get to know it. I have found by using the cataloging feature that I have tens of thousands of photographs. It will probably take me years to troll through them much less learn how to use Lightroom. I know… it must be time for a class to shorten my learning curve. After setting Lightroom onto my photographs to catalog them, I had to own that I am a photographer. I should just stop being quiet about it (since it was staring me in the face) and own that since I actually have about 15,000 or more photographs I've taken just from the last 5 or 6 years. Click happy me.

So in an effort to reduce the power of distraction on my time and energy I am going to stop teaching. I already spend a lot of time mentoring artists every day at ArtWorks and through the EDGE Program each Winter. I have come to realize that one can only mentor so much and I need my own creative time.

Light Dawns at the End of the Day, Meredith Arnold, 2014

I have a lot of jewelry to make and am excited about the prospect of digital collage as well as a lot of other projects I have in mind. Onward and upward!

 

 

A Good Thought

June 20, 2014

 

Be Brave With Your Life.

 

 

Studio Time is Fun!

April 18, 2014

Even though ArtWorks is pretty busy these days I always look forward to Art Spa Open Studio on Fridays. Artists drift in and out just to chat, knowing that other artists will be there working on something. It's a good touchstone day but I never get much done when people are there. Usually after they have all left is my time to get at least a few things made – usually components for jewelry or a specific project. Because it's so busy I don't bring anything super ambitious to work on. This way I'm happy if I can get three or four good results before I go home.

Today I got three pieces done and two of those I'm particularly happy with. They stretch my jewelry into new directions and expand into a new line for me in altered metals. I'm very excited about this work and hope others will find it appealing, too. Regardless, I'm having a great time finally bringing some ideas I've had for years into reality at last. I'm working on these new directions for the Garden Gallery show I am participating in next month and the Edmonds Art Studio Tour in Sept.

Check out http://www.edmondsartstudiotour.com for details when they're available.

Garson Kanin said it: Amateurs hope, professionals work.

So what does that mean? Think about the words 'art practice'. To have a practice infers consistency, regular hours, a schedule. It also implies that there is practice going on – a masterpiece isn't made every time one creates.

There is a great blog article on this here: http://jamesclear.com/schedule